Upcoming events

    • 29 Oct 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 397
    Register

    Hedda Bolgar Series

    Sheldon George, Ph.D

    (Wakefield , MA) 

    Friday, October 29, 2021

    Freud, Lacan and the Psychic Pleasures of Race

    7-9pm (CST) :ZOOM

    *** A recording will NOT be available for this session. ***


    About the presentation: Our political and social moment seems destabilized by an increased emphasis on racial difference.  But psychoanalysis has long ignored the stabilizing role aggression toward racial others has played in structuring society. Decades after American slavery ended, Freud, upon witnessing the horrors of World War I, first recognized within human subjects a drive toward aggression that he argued must be repressed for the sustainability of civilization.  This talk reads slavery as a full manifestation of this psychic drive toward aggression.  Through recourse to Lacanian theory, it argues that race functions as a source of psychic pleasure, or what Lacan calls jouissance.  This jouissance is a mode of enjoyment that lures the subject to perilous transgressions that stabilize American society into its consistently oppressive racial configuration.  Moving through an analysis of American slave masters’ efforts to establish slavery as a mask for what we can describe after Lacan as the psychic lack of the subject—a mask that refuted lack with racial superiority—the talk will turn to the writings of Zora Neale Hurston to describe religion and race as mechanisms through which African Americans themselves contend against social unveilings of psychic lack. Ending with a discussion of the role played by pleasure in contemporary incidents of police violence, the talk presents race as an apparatus that mediates subjective lack.  Race, it argues, binds contemporary American civilization to sustained modes of psychic pleasure and discontent that grew out of the atrocity of slavery.


    Sheldon George, PhD  is a Professor of English, a Lacanian theorist and a scholar of African-American literature. He is an associate editor of Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society and a guest editor of two special issues of the journal:  “African Americans and Inequality” (2014) and “Lacanian Psychoanalysis:  Interventions into Culture and Politics” (2018).  George’s book Trauma and Race:  A Lacanian Study of African American Racial Identity was published in 2016 by Baylor University Press.  He is coeditor of Reading Contemporary African American and Black British Women Writers: Narrative, Race, Ethics (Routledge 2020) and is currently completing a collection on Lacan and Race.

    Learning objectives:

    1.Develop a working understanding of Freud’s notion of the drive and Lacan’s concept of jouissance.

    2.Conceptualize the function of the drive and jouissance in some contemporary cultural moments of racial violence.

    3.Critically consider some moral questions about the value of racial identity and the significance of American slavery and psychic aggression to contemporary moments of violence.

    This is an intermediate level presentation

    Fees
    CCP members: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.
    Students:free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Fellows: free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50
    Student non-members, single admission: $15

    Continuing Education
    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by October 28, 2021 at tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Reading

    George, Sheldon.  Trauma and Race:  A Lacanian Analysis of African-American Identity.  Texas: Baylor UP, 2016.

    Lacan, J. (1998b) The Seminar of Jacques Lacan Book XI: The Four Fundamental

    Concepts of Psychoanalysis. Translated by A. Sheridan. New York: Norton.

    Gilman, S.L. (1993) Freud, Race and Gender. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Freud, S. (1915/1986) Thoughts for the Times on War and Death. Standard Edition 14.

    London: Hogarth Press, pp. 273–302.

    Freud, S. (1930/1986) Civilization and Its Discontents. Standard Edition 13. London: Hogarth Press, pp. 57–145.

    Gates Jr., H.L. (1992) Loose Canons: Notes on the Culture Wars. New York: Oxford. University Press.

    Presented by
    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Carol Ganzer, PhD, Toula Kourliouros Kalven,  Adina Bayuk Keesom, PsyD

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.



    • 12 Nov 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CST)
    • Zoom
    • 462
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series


    Richard Chefetz, MD

    (Washington, DC )

    November 12, 2021

    Humiliation Is Not Just About the Intent to Shame and Degrade

    7-9pm (CST): ZOOM Presentation and discussion


    About the presentation: Acute shame is distinguished from chronic shame by feeling like "I have been bad," where the latter is an eternity of "I am bad." In chronic shame a person tends to feel unlovable, and of no value. In humiliation the interminable badness of chronic shame morphs to feeling broken, defective beyond redemption. The humiliator often fully intends to shame. The impact is devastating, and when the humiliator takes pleasure in the collapse of their target, the sadism crushes the soul. While shame and humiliation are sibling emotions, they are not the same. In this presentation, the differences between shame and humiliation are mapped out, and clinical vignettes will be used to illustrate the value of making these powerful emotional experience distinct in the clinical dialogue.

    Richard A. Chefetz, M.D.(Washington, D.C; psychiatrist in private practice) Past president of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (2002-3), and Co-Founder and Chair of their Psychotherapy Training Program (2000-8), he is also a Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at the William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis, and Psychology. He is faculty at the Washington School of Psychiatry, the Institute of Contemporary Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis, and the Washington-Baltimore Center for Psychoanalysis. In 2015 he published Intensive Psychotherapy for Persistent Dissociative Process: The Fear of Feeling Real, with W.W. Norton, in their Interpersonal Neurobiology series.

    Learning objectives

    1. Participants will be able to describe the difference between the words affect, feeling, and emotion as well as the clinical utility of distinguishing between them.

    2. Participants will be able to describe the process by which shame and rage become welded together and the utility of this constellation of affects.

    3. Participants will be able to differentiate shame and humiliation and describe the utility of these differences in psychotherapeutic discourse.

    All Level Presentation

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.
    Students:free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Fellows: free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50
    Student non-members, single admission: $15

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by November 11, 2021 at tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Reading

    Leask, P. (2013). Losing trust in the world: Humiliation and its consequences. Psychodynamic Practice, 19(2), 129-142.

    Lewis, H. B. (1987). The role of shame in symptom formation. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates, Inc.

    Rothstein, A. (1984). Fear of humiliation. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 32(1), 99-116.

    Trumbull, D. (2003). Shame: an acute stress response to interpersonal traumatization. Psychiatry, 66(1), 53-64.

    Winnicott, D. W. (1949). Hate in the countertransference. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 30, 69-75.

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.



    • 10 Dec 2021
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CST)
    • Zoom
    • 476
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Donna Orange, Ph.D., Psy.D.

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, December 10, 2021

    Climate Justice and Psychotherapeutics

    7-9pm (CST): ZOOM Presentation and discussion

     

    About the presentation: Despite a tendency to avoid the warnings, times of crisis summon clinicians to emerge from comfortable consulting rooms.  Daily engaged with human suffering, we now face the inextricably bound together crises of global warming and massive social injustices. After considering historical and emotional causes of climate unconsciousness and of compulsive consumerism, we argue that only a radical ethics of responsibility to be “my other’s keeper” will truly wake us up to climate change and bring psychoanalysts to actively take on responsibilities, such as demanding change from governments, living more simply, flying less, and caring for the earth and its inhabitants everywhere.

    Dr. Donna Orange  is educated in philosophy, clinical psychology and psychoanalysis, Donna Orange, PhD, PsyD teaches at NYU Postdoc (New York); IPSS (Institute for the Psychoanalytic Study of Subjectivity, New York); and in private study groups. She also offers clinical consultation/supervision in these institutes and beyond. Recent books are Thinking for Clinicians: Philosophical Resources for Contemporary Psychoanalysis and the Humanistic Psychotherapies (2010), and The Suffering Stranger: Hermeneutics for Everyday Clinical Practice (2011), Nourishing the Inner Life of Clinicians and Humanitarians: The Ethical Turn in Psychoanalysis,and Climate Crisis, Psychoanalysis, and Radical Ethics (2016), and most recently, Psychoanalysis, History, and Radical Ethics: Learning to Hear (2020).  2021 Visiting Professor of Phenomenology, Duquesne University.

    .Learning objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to explain the concept of climate justice.

    2. Participants will be able to explain how history creates climate unconsciousness.

    This is an Intermediate level presentation.

    Fees
    CCP members: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.
    Students:free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Fellows: free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50
    Student non-members, single admission: $15

    Continuing Education
    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by November 11, 2021 at tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Reading

    Orange, D. (2017). Climate Crisis, Psychoanalysis, and Radical Ethics. London, Routledge. [Please read this small book before the seminar].

    Weintrobe, S. (2021). Psychological Roots of the Climate Crisis: Neoliberal Exceptionalism and the Culture of Uncare. New York, London, Bloomsbury.

    Gardiner, S. M. (2011). A perfect moral storm : the ethical tragedy of climate change. New York, Oxford University Press.

    Hansen, J. E. (2009). Storms of my grandchildren : the truth about the coming climate catastrophe and our last chance to save humanity. New York, Bloomsbury USA.

    "In Storms of My Grandchildren, Dr. James Hansen--the nation's leading scientist on climate issues--speaks out for the first time with the full truth about global warming: The planet is hurtling even more rapidly than previously acknowledged to a climatic point of no return. Although the threat of human-caused climate change is now widely recognized, politicians have failed to connect policy with the science, responding instead with ineffectual remedies dictated by special interests. Hansen shows why President Obama's solution, cap-and-trade, which Al Gore signed on to, won't work; why we must phase out all coal; and why 350 parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is a goal we must achieve if our children and grandchildren are to avoid global meltdown and the horrific storms of the book's title"--Cover, p. 2.

    Lifton, R. J. (2017). The climate swerve : reflections on mind, hope, and survival. New York, New Press.

    Moss, D. (2016). "Our Crying Planet: An Approach to the Problem of Climate Change Denial." Psychoanal. Q. 85(1): 189-197.

    Presented by
    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Carol Ganzer, PhD, Toula Kourliouros Kalven,  Adina Bayuk Keesom, PsyD

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.



    • 7 Jan 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CST)
    • Zoom
    • 484
    Register


    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Jill Salberg, PhD., ABPP

    (New York, NY)

    Friday January 7, 2022

    Maternal Envy as Legacy: Search for the Unknown Lost Maternal Object

    7-9pm (CST): ZOOM Presentation and discussion


    About the presentation: There has been a widening interest within psychoanalysis to understand the appearance and impact of intergenerational transmissions of trauma and the dissociative states of mind that cross from parents to their children.  Clinical material will be discussed showing how an early death of a mother ended uphaunting the lives of many generationsof mothers and daughters, refusing transformation. Considerations of attachment rupture, trauma, toxic envy, deadly and deadening aggression and shame will be discussed as part of transgenerational transmission phenomenon and how they are worked on in the analytic work. Envious attacks, while painful to tolerate, nonetheless need to be worked on within the analytic relationship so as to transform toxic transmissions from the past. 

    Jill Salberg, PhD., ABPP is consultant/supervisor at the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis where she has taught Termination and will be teaching a class on Trans-generational Transmissions, is faculty/supervisor at the Stephen Mitchell Center for Relational Studies, Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy and member of IPTAR. She is the editor of and contributor to Good Enough Endings: Breaks, Interruptions and Terminations from Contemporary Relational Perspectives (2010). She has co-edited with Sue Grand, The Wounds of History: Repair and Resilience in the Transgenerational Transmission of Trauma, and Transgenerational Trauma and the Other: Dialogues Across History and Difference, (2017), both won the Gradiva Award (2018). She has conceived of and co-edits a book series, Psyche and Soul: Psychoanalysis, Spirituality and Religion in Dialogue.  Her forthcoming edited book Psychoanalytic Credos: Personal and Professional Journeys of Psychoanalysts will be published in 2021. She is in private practice in Manhattan.

    Learning objectives:

    1.Participants will be able to describe how traumatic experiences of loss and envy are transmitted transgenerationally from mother to daughter.

    2.Participants will be able to explain how to work clinically with toxic transmissions of envy, aggression and shame.

    This is an intermediate and advanced presentation

    Fees
    CCP members: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.
    Students:free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Fellows: free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50
    Student non-members, single admission: $15

    Continuing Education
    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by January 6, 2022 at tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Reading

    Apprey, M. (1996). Phenomenology of Transgenerational Haunting: Subjects in Apposi- tion, Subjects on Urgent/Voluntary Errands. Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Research Col- lections. 

    Faimberg, H. (1988). The telescoping of generations: Genealogy of certain identifications. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 24:99-117.

    Salberg, J. (2019). “Old Objects Die Hard: Generational Ruptures.” Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 29, (6): 637-652.

    Salberg, J. (2015) “The Texture of Traumatic Attachment: Presence and Ghostly Absence in

    Trans-generational Transmissions.” Psychoanalytic Quarterly, LXXXIV, 1: 21-46.

    Schechter, D. (2017). On traumatically skewed intersubjectivity. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 37(4), 251–264. doi:10.1080/ 07351690.2017.1299500

    Presented by
    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Carol Ganzer, PhD, Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Adina Bayuk Keesom, PsyD

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.





    • 28 Jan 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CST)
    • Zoom
    • 478
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Anton Hart, Ph.D, FABP, FIPA

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, January 28, 2022

    Aspiring to tolerate being a “bad”, yet ethical, analyst: Radical openness to one’s ordinary failures

    7-9pm (CST): ZOOM Presentation and discussion


    About the presentation: We ordinarily become psychoanalysts because of early-acquired, conscious and unconscious desires to be helpful to others, starting with our caretakers. Yet, experience shows that a central aspect of each psychoanalytic process ordinarily involves our (rather regular) failure to be helpful to those with whom we work. This is so even in cases that could be regarded as successes. While our unconscious intolerance of such failure is likely to compound its negative impact through various forms of disavowal (including, in some instances, the making of transference interpretations), our willingness to be open to receiving information about, and to considering, how we are hurting instead of helping (and the unconscious, personal bases for such negative impact) is key to enabling analysands to speak as freely and openly as possible as they attempt to formulate their experience, unhindered by their self-subverting protection of their analysts.

    Dr. Hart is Training and Supervising Analyst and Faculty of the William Alanson White Institute. He presents and consults nationally and internationally. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of Psychoanalytic Psychology and Contemporary Psychoanalysis. He has published articles and book chapters on a variety of subjects including psychoanalytic safety and mutuality, issues of racial, sexual, and other diversities, and psychoanalytic pedagogy.  He is a member of the group, Black Psychoanalysts Speak and, also, Co-produced and was featured in the documentary film of the same name. He teaches at The Manhattan Institute, Mt. Sinai Hospital, the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy, the National Institute for the Psychotherapies National Training Program, the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, the Institute for Relational Psychoanalysis of Philadelphia, and the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis. He serves as Co-Chair of the Holmes Commission on Racial Equality in the American Psychoanalytic Association. He is in full-time private practice of psychoanalysis, individual and couple psychotherapy, psychotherapy supervision and consultation, and organizational consultation, in New York.

    Learning objectives:

    1) Participants will be able to explain how psychoanalysts’ attachment to their own senses of personal goodness can interfere with their ability to receive and consider information to the contrary.

    2) Participants will be able to describe the limitations of a system of psychotherapeutic ethics that relies on adherence to external ethical codes.

    Level of the program: All levels

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.
    Students:free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Fellows: free with annual $150 membership, payable at registration.
    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50
    Student non-members, single admission: $15

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by January 27, 2022 at tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Reading

    Apprey, M. (1996). Phenomenology of Transgenerational Haunting: Subjects in Apposi- tion, Subjects on Urgent/Voluntary Errands. Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Research Col- lections. 

    Faimberg, H. (1988). The telescoping of generations: Genealogy of certain identifications. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 24:99-117.

    Salberg, J. (2019). “Old Objects Die Hard: Generational Ruptures.” Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 29, (6): 637-652.

    Salberg, J. (2015) “The Texture of Traumatic Attachment: Presence and Ghostly Absence in

    Trans-generational Transmissions.” Psychoanalytic Quarterly, LXXXIV, 1: 21-46.

    Schechter, D. (2017). On traumatically skewed intersubjectivity. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 37(4), 251–264. doi:10.1080/ 07351690.2017.1299500

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Carol Ganzer, PhD, Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Adina Bayuk Keesom, PsyD

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.



    • 18 Feb 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CST)
    • Zoom
    • 480
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Neil Altman, Ph.D

    (Cambridge, MA)

    Friday, February 18, 2022

    White Privilege: Psychoanalytic Perspectives

    7-9pm (CST) :ZOOM



    • 11 Mar 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CST)
    • Zoom
    • 482
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Peter Reiner, Ph.D., LMFT

    (Chicago, Il)

    Friday, March 11, 2022

    Projective and Introjective Identification:  Graphic Illustrations from Couples Therapy

    7-9pm (CST) :ZOOM

    ****A recording will NOT be available for this session****




    • 25 Mar 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 483
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Steven Kuchuck, DSW, LCSW

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, March 25, 2022

     Love, Longing and Desire:

       On the Analyst’s Erotic Subjectivity

    7-9pm (CST) :ZOOM

    ****A recording will NOT be available for this session****



    • 8 Apr 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 483
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Anthony Bass Ph.D

    (New York, NY  )

    Friday, April 8, 2022

    The Dialogue of Unconsciouses, Mutual Analysis and the Uses of the Self in Contemporary Relational Psychotherapy.

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM


    • 6 May 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 484
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Nina Thomas, Ph.D., ABPP

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, May 6, 2022

    Haunted by haunted minds: Decolonizing psychoanalytic

    work with historically traumatized peoples

    7-9pm (CST) :ZOOM


    • 20 May 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 485
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Jack Foehl, Ph.D

    ( Boston, MA)

    Friday, May 20, 2022

    Lived Depth: Exploring dimensionality and Thirdness in Clinical Process 

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM


    • 24 Jun 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 488
    Register

    Fridays @ CCP Lecture Series

    Dominique Scarfone, MD

    (Montreal ,Canada)

    Friday, June 24, 2022

    Within you, without you : psychoanalysis and the artisan mind

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM


    • 15 Aug 2022
    • (CDT)
    Register


    Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
    Certificate Program


    The CCP Certificate in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Program provides a course of study in psychoanalytic theory and therapy for interested individuals – both clinicians and theorists – who would like to deepen their knowledge of the field.

    Directed by Adina Bayuk Keesom, PsyD, the program has two tracks,  a clinical track and an academic track for those who wish to strengthen their backgrounds in psychoanalytic theory but who are not practicing clinicians. Students in the academic track will follow the same program as students in the clinical track, although their focus will be determined through discussion with their individual consultants.

    For a detailed description of the Two-Year Certificate Program, and the additional offerings of a Third Year Bridge Certificate Program in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, please read the details on the PPCP page.



Past events

8 Oct 2021 Hedda Bolgar Series: The Biopsychosocial Significance of Understanding Racial Battle Fatigue (William Smith, PhD)
17 Sep 2021 Hedda Bolgar Series: Plenty Good Room: The Theoretical and Therapeutic Contributions of Margaret Morgan Lawrence-- Pioneer African American Psychoanalyst, Psychiatrist, and Pediatrician (Claude Barbre, MS, MDiv, PhD, LP)
11 Jun 2021 Fridays @ CCP: An Overview of Freud’s Cases (Alan Bass, PhD)
14 May 2021 Fridays @ CCP: The Haunting of Hill House:Psyche, Soma, and Destiny (Marilyn Charles, PhD)
23 Apr 2021 Fridays @ CCP: A Psychodynamic Response to Community Trauma: A Case Study and Panel Discussion (Jonathan Foiles, LCSW)
9 Apr 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Narcissistic States of White Privilege and the Constructive Role of Shame (Stephen Anen, PhD)
19 Mar 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Divided against Oneself: Shame, Inhibition and Life’s Aftermath (Peter Shabad, PhD)
26 Feb 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Doppelgangers in the Mirror: Identifications with the Oppressor and Traumatic Psychosocial Inductions (Claude Barbre, PhD)
5 Feb 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Orphans of the Real-Revisited (Joseph Newirth, PhD)
15 Jan 2021 Fridays @ CCP: The Desire for Change: From Freud's Conversion to Today's Conversion Disorder (Jamieson Webster, PhD)
4 Dec 2020 Fridays @ CCP: The Elusive Good Object (Lynne Zeavin, PsyD)
6 Nov 2020 Fridays @ CCP: The Untelling: Enactment, Time, and Narrative in Psychoanalysis (Robert Grossmark, PhD)
16 Oct 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Field Theory and the Dream Sense (Donnel Stern, PhD)
11 Sep 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Transcendence in the Analytic Process (Frank Summers, PhD)
12 Jun 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Alan Bass, PhD - The Development Kleinian Theory and Practice
6 Mar 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Andrea Celenza, PhD - The Erotic Field and the Fate of Feminine Signifiers
7 Feb 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Ghislaine Boulanger, PhD - Psychoanalytic Witnessing: Professional Obligation or Moral Imperative?
17 Jan 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Alan Levy, PhD - Psychodynamics, Integration, and Multiplicity: Object Constancy Reconsidered
3 May 2019 Fridays @ CCP: Stephen Seligman, PhD - Psychoanalytic Babies:Relational-Developmental Psychoanalysis Now
26 Apr 2019 The Ethics of Best Practices: Psychoanalytic Treatment of Psychosis in the Community
12 Apr 2019 Fridays @ CCP: Dominique Scarfone, MD - Free-association, surprise, trauma and transference
29 Mar 2019 Fridays @ CCP: Ester Hadassa Sandler, MD & Paulo Cesar Sandler, MD - Some ideas on ‘ mentalities’: an approach to the study of Bion’s contributions to Psychoanalysis
15 Mar 2019 Fridays @CCP: Fashioning a New Psychoanalysis: Freudianism and the Masses Between the World Wars
7 Dec 2018 Fridays @ CCP: Todd Essig, PhD - Psychoanalysis, Technology And Innovation: How "Local Therapy" is the Future
2 Nov 2018 Fridays @ CCP: Sarah Nettleton - Idiom, self and character

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