Upcoming events

    • 25 Feb 2024
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM (CST)
    • 20 W. Kinzie, Chicago, IL (Kinzie Hotel) or via Zoom
    • 475

    Sundays @ CCP

    CANCELED

    Allan Scholom, PhD

    (Chicago, Il)

    Sunday, February 25, 2024

    The influence of therapist subjectivity in driving  the 

        psychotherapy experience and patient change


    Kinzie Hotel

    20 W. Kinzie. Chicago, Il

    &

    ZOOM

    12-2pm (CST)

    About the presentation: In recent years we have reemphasized the importance of the therapeutic relationship resulting in change in the patient in virtually all approaches to psychotherapy. One crucial element in the relationship is the role of the therapists subjectivity (including countertransference) in driving the therapeutic experience and change in the patient.  While the importance of countertransference is generally acknowledged, the significance  of the therapist’s subjectivity which includes individual life experiences, personal familial history, values,  conflicts and motivations both conscious and unconscious, is in recent years receiving increasing attention. 

    In this context some patients engage us in ways that stir our vulnerabilities and force us to confront our various conflicts and limitations. Our willingness to do this can drive treatment in powerful ways at conscious and unconscious levels as both patient and therapist struggle to find growth from the therapeutic milieu. The motivation and capacity of the therapist to do this can be pivotal in driving change in the patient especially in those patients who reach our deeper vulnerabilities. We will explore how vital the pursuit of personal growth is for the therapist in driving the course of therapy and change in the patient. 

    Allan Scholom, PhD, is Immediate Past President of the Section of Psychoanalyst Practitioners of the Society for Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Psychology of the American Psychological Association, on the Faculty and Board of the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis, on the Faculty of the Institute for Clinical Social Work, and a Founder and Member of the Steering Committee of the Psychotherapy Action Network. 

    He has served as President of the Chicago Association for Psychoanalytic Psychology, First Vice Chairperson of the Chicago Community Mental Health Board,  Founder and Chairperson of the Illinois Coalition of Mental Health Professionals and Consumers, and as a Mental Health Policy Advisor to Illinois US Senator Adlai Stevenson, Jr. 

    Dr. Scholom has published and presented widely on the interface between psychoanalysis and politics, primarily regarding mental/health care issues. His teaching has focused on the importance of the therapist’s subjectivity in driving therapeutic change. Dr. Scholom is in the private practice of psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and supervision in Chicago.


    Learning objectives:

    1 - Participants will learn to identify the various factors that determine therapist subjectivity both conscious and unconscious.

    2 - Participants will learn  how to use their subjectivity in driving the course of psychotherapy and patient change.

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $40

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by February 24, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.





    • 10 Mar 2024
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM (CDT)
    • 20 W. Kinzie, Chicago, IL (Kinzie Hotel) or via Zoom
    • 478
    Register

    Sundays @ CCP


    Charles Turk, MD

    (Chicago, Il)

    Sunday, March 10, 2024

    The Place of Aesthetics in Psychoanalytic Work with a Psychotic Woman.


    Kinzie Hotel

    20 W. Kinzie. Chicago, Il

    &

    ZOOM

    12-2pm (CST)

    About the presentation: This is an account of 28 years work with a deeply disturbed woman.  She presented difficulties in management, dealt with outside a hospital in an office practice.  Aesthetics enabled her to draw what she struggled to speak of but could not.  The progress of her analysis is compared with the course of people treated at a psychoanalytic treatment program for psychotic young adults in Quebec City known as “388” the street address of a mansion that houses it.  It has produced a 70% cure rate: the person’s delusion is dismantled and he/she enjoys productive and satisfying activity in the community he had isolated him/herself from.  The treatment structure and the meta-psychologic elaborations developed there that yield these results provides a framework for reconceptualizing transference, the mobilization of the unconscious, and the expressive aspects of enactments.

    Charles Turk is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst practicing in Chicago. Chicago and obtained psychoanalytic training at the Center for Psychoanalytic Study in Chicago.  He continued his psycho- analytic studies at the Ecole Freudienne du Quebec, and is an analyst of GIFRIC.  He the Responsible for the Chicago Circle Association, a local group affiliated with the Ecole du Quebec.  

    He is a faculty and board member of the Chicago Center for  Psychoanalysis and a board member of Expanded Mental Health Sevices the organization that founded the Kedzie Center the first  taxpayer funded community mental health center in Chicago.  He volunteers there as clinican and consultant, conducting a continous case seminar. 

    He graduated from Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and was a resident at the Neuropsychiatric Institute at the University of Illinois.  He has long pursued an interest in the treatment of psychotic and other severely ill people.  For twelve years he was medical director of a partial hospitalization program in the Kenneth Young Center, in suburban Chicago, for which he received an Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill in 1992.

     In 2004 he received a Local Educator award from the International Federation for Psychoanalytic Education - where he makes frequent presentations on various aspects of his work with psychotic patients, including a recent presentation on Project 606 - an organization promoting treatment programs alternative to hospitaliztion for severely disturbed individuals. 

    Learning objectives:

    1 – Participants will be able to explain the effectiveness of psychoanalysitic work with psychotics, despite its being deemed contraindicated within our field.

    2 – Participants will be able to identify enduring psychotic work as an “Interior alterity” that often goes unnoticed. 


    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $40

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).


    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by March 9, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.


    • 22 Mar 2024
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 388
    Register

    Fridays @CCP

    Elizabeth Corpt, MSW, LICSW

    (Arlington, MA)

    Friday, March 22, 2024

    With which Catastrophe, and in What Way, Do we Intervene? Psychoanalytic thoughts on the first quarter of this century.

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM Presentation & Discussion


    About the presentation: As we near the end of the first quarter of this century, what are we facing, as psychoanalysts, as citizens, and as human beings? We are used to intervening with a lone patient, or maybe, two, if we happen to work with couples, in the quiet of the consulting rooms. Perhaps, for some of us, at least some of the time, screens have replaced bodies in offices. Outside of these private spaces, children, people of color, and others deemed unacceptable, are terrified and or murdered as millions of displaced human beings roam the earth seeking shelter and safety. Sea levels are rising, as is the threat of fascism. Can we rely on deep work to do enough, soon enough, to make for better human beings, and a safer world? Do our theories have more to offer? We can not do it all. How do we ethically determine our best impact and match it to who we are, individually and collectively?

    Elizabeth Corpt is Past-President, Supervising Analyst, Faculty Member, and Board Member of the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis. She spent 20 years as Teaching Associate and Clinical Supervisor at the Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry at the Cambridge Health Alliance Program for Psychotherapy.  Currently the Co-Chief Editor of the journal Psychoanalysis, Self and Context, she has written, published, and presented on topics such as clinical generosity, the impact of social class on the forming of an analytic identity, and relational ethics. She maintains a private practice in Arlington, MA.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Participants will be able to describe catastrophes facing psychoanalysis.

    2. Participants will be able to explain the importance of matching impact to    catastrophe.


    This is an Intermediate Level Presentation

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by March 21, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Readings

    Corpt, E. (2023) Ethical Labor: A step toward reparations within psychoanalysis. In D. Goodman, M. Manilli (Eds.). Meaningless suffering: Traumatic marginalization. New York, NY: Routledge (in press).

    Corpt, E. (2015) Ethical labor: The ground between experience near and experience distant: Discussion of Cushman's Two worlds or one. Psychoanalysis, Self and Context,15 (3), 227-229.

    Cushman, P. (2015). Two worlds or one? Politics inside and outside the consulting room. Psychoanalysis, Self and Context, 15 (3), 218-226.

    Friedman, A., Nakash, O., (2023). Repetition compulsion and sociopolitical trauma: A neoliberal artifact. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 33(2), 200-213.

    Holmes, D.E (2016). Culturally imposed trauma: The sleeping dog has awakened. Will psychoanalysis take heed? Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 26 (6) 641-654.

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.


    • 12 Apr 2024
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 464
    Register

    Fridays @CCP

    Sheldon George, PhD

    (Boston, MA)

    Friday, April 12, 2024

    Trauma and the Making of Black Identity in Contemporary America


    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM Presentation & Discussion

    RECORDING WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE


    About the presentation: In a historical moment when the news media has repeatedly displayed the wanton killing of black men, the connection between African American identity and trauma seems especially salient. Sheldon George’s talk will work through Lacanian psychoanalytic notions of subjectivity to ground an understanding of African American identity as mediated by social trauma. It will address, in particular, the 2012 Florida shooting of 17-year old Jordan Davis by Michael Dunn, a white male whose excessive response to the loud rap music played by Davis and his friends demonstrates a Lacanian understanding of jouissance, or the other’s mode of enjoyment, as a root source of notions of racial alterity. The talk will discuss how this jouissance, bound to fantasies of race, often structures both racism and African American identity around acts of violence and trauma, inducing African Americans to embrace willfully the very racial identities against which this violence is directed.

    Sheldon George is Chair of the department of Literature & Writing at Simmons University in Boston, Massachusetts.  His scholarship centers on application of cultural and literary theory to analyses of American and African American literature and culture.  George is chair of the Executive Committee of the MLA forum Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Literature.  He is an associate editor of Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society and has coedited two special issues of that journal: one titled “Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Interventions into Culture and Politics” and the other titled “African Americans and Inequality.”  His book Trauma and Race, published in 2016, is the first to offer an extended Lacanian analysis of African American identity.  George is coeditor, with Jean Wyatt, of Reading Contemporary Black British and African American Women Writers; and his recent publications include the pioneering collection of essays, coedited with Derek Hook, Lacan and Race: Racism, Identity and Psychoanalytic Theory.

    Learning objectives

    Participants will be able to understand the role of otherness in Lacanian theory

    Participants will be able to apply key Lacanian concepts like Aggressivity, Extimacy and Jouissance to a psychoanalytic understanding of race and racism


    The presentation  will be introductory and will require only basis orientation with psychoanalytic theory.

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by April 11, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Readings

    1. George, Sheldon.  Trauma and Race:  A Lacanian Analysis of African-American Identity.  Texas: Baylor UP, 2016.

    2. Laurent, Eric. “Racism 2.0.” Lacan Quotidien 371: 1–6 (2014).

    3. Hook, Derek. Racism and jouissance: Evaluating the ‘racism as (the theft of) enjoyment’ hypothesis.”  Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society.  Special Issue on “Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Interventions in Culture and Politics.”  Sept. 2018, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 

    4.Stephens, Michelle.  “Skin, stain and lamella: Fanon, Lacan, and inter-racializing the gaze.” Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society.  Special Issue on “Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Interventions in Culture and Politics.”  Sept. 2018, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 

    Reference 5: Swales, Stephanie.  “Transphobia in the bathroom: Sexual difference, alterity and jouissance.” Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society.  Special Issue on “Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Interventions in Culture and Politics.”  Sept. 2018, Vol. 23, Issue 3. 

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.


    • 28 Apr 2024
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM (CDT)
    • 20 W. Kinzie, Chicago, IL (Kinzie Hotel) or via Zoom
    • 487
    Register

    Sundays @ CCP


    Zak Mucha, LCSW

    (Chicago, Il)

    Sunday, April 28 , 2024

    Swimming to the Horizon: Crack, Psychosis, and Street-Corner Social Work

    Kinzie Hotel

    20 W. Kinzie. Chicago, Il

    &

    ZOOM

    12-2pm (CST)

    About the presentation: Working with a transient and traumatized population suffering severe psychotic symptoms, homelessness, and addictions, the patient/clinician relationship must be about more than medication monitoring and case management. The relationship itself can hold hope for patients who have been failed repeatedly by community mental health systems, especially in non-traditional clinical frames where the limiting medicalization standards place a barrier reinforcing the idea of “us and them,” and refusing the clinician’s responsibility to be a vulnerable human with an irreducible responsibility to the other.

    This presentation will examine the psychoanalytic possibilities of joining the patients’ worlds, both internal and external, to understand how psychotic symptoms can hold a narrative of past trauma and possess the hope for an emerging self. Using clinical material from the book, Swimming to the Horizon: Crack, Psychosis, and Street-Corner Social Work, we will discuss ways of engaging, understanding, and thinking of individuals presenting with severe psychotic symptoms. Through a psychoanalytic lens not available back then, we find some interventions which may not have had any psychodynamic intentions did have such impact while other interventions meant to be therapeutic might not have been at all.

    Zak Mucha, LCSW, is a psychoanalyst in private practice and an executive board member at the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. He spent seven years working as the supervisor of an Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) program, providing 24/7 services to persons suffering from severe psychosis, substance abuse issues, and homelessness. Mucha has also worked as a counselor and consultant for U.S. combat veterans undergoing training for digital forensic investigations in child pornography. Before going into the clinical field, he worked as a freelance journalist, truck driver, furniture mover, construction worker, union organizer, staff member at a juvenile DCFS locked unit, and taught briefly at a women’s prison. He is the author of Emotional Abuse: A Manual for Self-Defense and Swimming to the Horizon: Crack, Psychosis, and Street-Corner Social Work.

    Learning objectives:

    1.Participants will be able to examine the possibilities for psychodynamic work with patients suffering from severe psychosis and all the socioeconomic factors that stem from a life on the margins of society.

    2.Participants will be able to discuss how psychotic symptoms can be considered a trauma response both embedded with a narrative and an effort to protect the self.

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $40

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by April 27, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.


    • 3 May 2024
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 459
    Register

    Fridays @CCP

    Anton Hart, PhD., FABP, FIPA

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, May 3, 2024

    Reflections on the analyst’s co-participation: radical openess and the self-protective aspects of the concept of transference

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM Presentation & Discussion


    RECORDING WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE


    About the presentation: In order for the analyst to listen closely and be moved by the analysand, the analyst must be open. barticulartv to what is most foreian in the analvsand's discourse. in his previous visit to OPC, Anton Hart presented the concept of "radical openness", a dispositional stance that involves the analyst's "taking to heart" the things that the analysand experiences and formulates in relation to the analyst, both familiar and strange, as if there is likely to be truth within them no matter what. The radically open analyst aspires to take things that do not seem to personally apply and to live with them as potential truths that are beyond the analyst's tolerable awareness

    Freud invented the idea of transference in order to enable the analyst to bear the strain of listening closely while feeling unrecognized. In this sense the quite central concept of transference can be seen as having served as a set-protective edifice for analysts as they try to keep listening, even as they may regularly feel not listened to. But the downside ot analysts adherence to the transference concept is that it may prevent them from being as open to the truths contained in analysands experience as analysts need to be in order to be moved, that is, to emotionally understand and to personally grow and evolve in response to the analysand's discourse.

    Dr. Hart is Training and Supervising Analyst and Faculty of the William Alanson White Institute. He lectures and consults nationally and internationally. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Psychoanalytic Psychology and Contemporary Psychoanalysis. He has published articles and book chapters on a variety of subjects including psychoanalytic safety and mutuality, issues of racial, sexual and other diversities, and psychoanalytic pedagogy.  He is a member of the group, Black Psychoanalysts Speak, and, also, Co-produced and was featured in the documentary film of the same name. He teaches at  Mt. Sinai Hospital, the National Institute for the Psychotherapies National Training Program, the Institute for Relational Psychoanalysis of Philadelphia, and the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis. He serves as Co-Chair of the Holmes Commission on Racial Equality. He is in the process of completing a book for Routledge entitled, Beyond Oaths or Codes: Toward a Relational Psychoanalytic Ethics. He is in full-time private practice of psychoanalysis, individual and couple psychotherapy, psychotherapy supervision and consultation, and organizational consultation, in New York.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants in this presentation will be able to:

    1) Develop an understanding the concept of "radical openness"

    2) Recognize the ways in which the concept o† transference may represent a form of resistance to listening as fully and openly as possible to what the analysand conveys

    This is an Intermediate /Advanced Level Presentation

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by May 2, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Readings

    Powell, D.R., Hart, A. (In press). African Americans and Psychotherapeutic Treatment: Challenges and Opportunities, in Gabbard's Textbook of Psychotherapeutic Treatments, 2nd Edition, Edited by Crisp, H, Gabbard, G., American Psychiatric Association Publishing, Washington, DC.

    Matheny, B., Teng, B., & Hart, A. (2021). Radical Openness: An interview with Anton Hart (Part I). Room, 2:21, 14-17.

    Matheny, B., Hart, A., & Teng, B. (2021). Radical Openness: An interview with Anton Hart (Part II). Room, 6:21, 38-43.

    Hart, A. H. (2020). Principles for teaching diversity and otherness from a psychoanalytic perspective. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 56(2-3), 404-417.

    Hart, A. H. (2019). The discriminatory gesture: A psychoanalytic consideration of posttraumatic reactions to incidents of racial discrimination, Psychoanalytic Social Work, 24 April, 2-20.

    Hart, A. (2017). From multicultural competence to radical openness: A psychoanalytic engagement of otherness. The American Psychoanalyst, 51(1), 12-27.

    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.

    • 17 May 2024
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 467
    Register

    Fridays @CCP

    Chanda Griffin, LCSW

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, May 17, 2024

    The Desire for the in-Between: Humans, Animals and our natural environment in an anti-black world

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM Presentation & Discussion


    About the presentation: In Who’s on My Couch? Considering BIPOC Subjectivity and the Climate Crisis, Psychoanalytic Dialogues I ask two questions: “Are psychoanalytic theories expansive enough to apply to the BIPOC psyche with respect to the climate crisis when both the BIPOC body and the earth serve as HOSTs for a parasitic white supremacist culture and capitalism? I also ask, “In [the] dialectical opposition of protecting the environment or the immediacy of protecting the body and mind, who or what is given primacy?

    Using both myth and art as well as black feminists and other discussions of the human-animal binary, this presentation explores the impact of the western philosophical notion of “the human” as it pertains to our relationship to animals and the environment within anti-black socio-political world.

    Chanda D. Griffin, LCSW, is a teaching, training, and supervising analyst at the Manhattan Institute for Psychoanalysis (MIP) and co-chair of the Committee on Race and Ethnicity at MIP. Additionally, she is a faculty member of the National Institute For the Psychotherapies. (NIP),The Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis (ICP)and an Adjunct Professor at the Silberman Graduate School of Social Work at Hunter College.  Chanda is the co-author of The Secret Society: Perspectives from a Multiratial Cohort (with Rossanna Eceygoyén and Julie Hyman) and author of Who’s on my couch: BIPOC subjectivity and the climate crisis, the MIP blog essay: Red Pill Psychoanalysis and the Matrix of Racial Roles, and the  Psychoanalytic Activist,: Centered. Chanda is a member of Black Psychoanalysts Speak and is in private practice in New York City.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Participants will develop an understanding of the human animal binary inherent in foundational philosophies of the “humanities.” 

    2. Participants will identify anti-blackness in within the human-animal binary

    3. Participants will learn a more nuanced way of listening to BIPOC relationships to the animal and natural environment.


    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by April 4, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Readings

    Griffin, C.D., (2022) Who’s on My Couch? Considering BIPOC Subjectivity and the Climate Crisis, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 32:4, 340-341, DOI: 10.1080/10481885.2022.2090807


    Jackson, Z.I. (2020). Becoming Human: Matter and Meaning in a An Antiblack World. New York University Press.


    Karkulehto,S. Kristine, A., Varis, E. (2019) Reconfiguring Human, Nonhuman and Posthuman in Literature and Culture.


    Moss, /d. (2021). On having whiteness. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, (69(2), 355-371. PMID: 34039063 https://doi.org/10.1177/00030651211008507


    Sheets-Johnston, M. (1996). Human Versus Nonhuman: Binary Opposition as An Ordering Principle of Western Human Thought.


    Wilderson, F. B. (2020). Afropessimism. Liveright Publishing Corporation.


    Karkulehto,S. Kristine, A., Varis, E. (2019) Reconfiguring Human, Nonhuman and Posthuman in Literature and Culture.


    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.



    • 31 May 2024
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 468
    Register

    Fridays @CCP

    Amy Schwartz- Cooney, PhD

    (New York, NY)

    Friday, May 31, 2024

    Socio-Personal Conversations and Relational Transformations 

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM Presentation & Discussion


    About the presentation: I am a white identified, cis-gendered Jewish analyst from New York.  In this presentation I describe my growing understanding of the role of context and culture in psychic life and my consequent efforts to incorporate socio-personal explorations into relationally informed therapy. I draw on treatments in which the patient’s social/racial identities differed from and/or were similar to my own, providing opportunities to consider otherness, sameness, difference and intersectionality from multiple vectors.  Each treatment involved identifying and overcoming resistances and dissociations, locating the hated and hateful, feared and fearful other within,  and finding ways to speak to the personal and social, acknowledging their singular and entwining influences. Each treatment facilitated mutual growth and transformation, enabling both partners to recognize disclaimed and undervalued aspects of self, tapping into vulnerabilities around acceptance, inclusion, and belonging.  The therapeutic processes described were challenging and vitalizing,  potentiating a deepened and more complex sense of self and other as multiply constituted subjects. This presentation queries the purview of the psychoanalytic and invites attendees to interrogate their own “credos” in light of the social turn. Attendees will be encouraged to participate in the discussion of the presented material, bring in thoughts and questions, and share germane personal and clinical experiences. 

    Dr. Amy Schwartz Cooney is on faculty at the NYU Post-Doctoral Program in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy in the Relational Track. She is Faculty/Supervisor at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies and the Stephen Mitchell Center for Relational Studies. She is Joint Editor in Chief, Psychoanalytic Dialogues and is Co-Editor/Contributor to the 2021 book, Vitalization in Psychoanalysis: Perspectives on Being and Becoming, published by Routledge. She is particularly interested in the application and integration of object relational perspectives in the contemporary psychoanalytic conversation.

    Learning Objectives

    After attending this seminar participants will be able to: 

    1. Work from a relational framework with the socio-personal, with particular emphasis on the analyst exploring dissociated areas of her own experience to be of use to the patient in knowing and integrating her own disclaimed identifications. 

    2. Recognize and explore sameness and difference in their clinical work in a way that is vitalizing and contributes to a more nuanced understanding of the entwining of individual and cultural factors in constituting self and other. 

    This is an Intermediate Level Presentation

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by May 30, 2024 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Readings

    Davies, J.M. (2004). Whose Bad Objects Are We Anyway? Psychoanal. Dial., 14 (6):711-732.

    Botticelli, S. (2023). Can We “Treat” Racism in Psychoanalysis. Div. Rev., 29, 19-22.  

    Burch, B. (2021) Engaging the Whitewashed Countertransference: Race Unexpectedly Appears for Therapy. Psychoanal Dial. 31:28-37

    Levine, L. (2022). Interrogating Race, Shame and Mutual Vulnerability:Overlapping and Interlapping Waves of Relation, Psychoanal. Dial. 32, 99-113.

    Pogue White, K. (2002). Surviving Hating and Being Hated: Some Personal Thoughts About Racism from a Psychoanalytic Perspective . Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 38(3):401-422 

    Schwartz Cooney, A. (2018). Vitalizing Enactment: A Relational Exploration. Psychoanal Dial. 28, 340-354. 

    Shaw, D. (2021). When Racialized Ghosts Refuse to Become Ancestors: Tasting the "Blood of Recognition" in Racial Melancholia and Mixed-Race Identities. Psychoanal. Dial. 32, 584-597.  


    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.





    • 21 Jun 2024
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (CDT)
    • Zoom
    • 466
    Register

    Fridays @CCP

    Paul Williams, PhD

    (Greenbrae,  CA)

    Friday, June 21, 2024

    Soul Murder Revisited

    7-9pm: (CST): ZOOM Presentation & Discussion


    About the presentation: The term ‘Soul Murder’ has a long history in literature and in mental health literature. In psychoanalysis, Freud  addressed the matter in his analysis of Schreber's memoirs and later Leonard Shengold developed the subject in the 1990's. In this  lecture Soul Murder is revisited, including from the point of view of theory of technique. Identifying and treating Soul Murder presents unique clinical obstacles for the psychoanalyst , some of which will be discussed

    Dr Paul Williams trained as a Psychoanalyst with The British Psychoanalytical Society where he was a Training and Supervising Analyst. He won the Rosenfeld Essay Prize for the treatment of severe disturbance. He was Joint Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis with Glen Gabbard between 2001 and 2007 and became a Consultant Psychotherapist in the British National Health Service in Belfast, Northern Ireland, where he worked in an out-patient clinic and a Forensic Unit to provide treatment for traumatized patients. He lives and works in private psychoanalytic practice in Northern California. He has published many papers and books on the subject of severe disturbance and psychosis. He recently produced a highly acclaimed experimental trilogy on the literary depiction of severe disturbance from the inside: The Fifth Principle (Routledge, 2010). Scum (Routledge, 2013), The Authority of Tenderness (Routledge 2021). 

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    1. Distinguish key characteristics of Soul Murder.

    2. Gain a sense of clinical parameters usable in the treatment of Soul Murder, including in its psychotic manifestations.


    This is an Intermediate /Advanced Level Presentation

    Fees

    CCP members: free with annual $195 membership, payable at registration.

    Students:free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Fellows: free with annual $175 membership, payable at registration.

    Non-CCP members, single admission: $50

    Continuing Education

    This program is sponsored for Continuing Education Credits by the Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis. There is no commercial support for this program, nor are there any relationships between the continuing education sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If the program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CCP is licensed by the state of Illinois to sponsor continuing education credits for Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Counselors and Licensed Clinical Psychologists (license no. 159.000941 and 268.000020 and 168.000238 Illinois Dept. of Financial and Professional Regulation).

    Professionals holding the aforementioned credentials will receive 2.0 continuing education credits for attending the entire program. To receive these credits a completed evaluation form must be turned in at the end of the presentation and licensed psychologists must first complete a brief exam on the subject matter. No continuing education credit will be given for attending part of the presentation. Refunds for CE credit after the program begins will not be honored. If a participant has special needs or concerns about the program, s/he/they should contact Toula Kourliouros Kalven by June 20, 2023 at: tkalven@ccpsa.org

    References/Suggested Readings

    FREUD S (1911B) ‘PSYCHO-ANALYTICAL NOTES ON AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ACCOUNT OF A CASE OF PARANOIA (DEMENTIA PARANOIDES’).’ SE12: 9-79

    SHENGOLD, L. (2011) TRAUMA, SOUL MURDER, AND CHANGE. PSYCHOANALYTIC QUARTERLY 80:121-138

    SHENGOLD, L. (1978) KASPAR HAUSER AND SOUL MURDER: A STUDY OF DEPRIVATION. INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PSYCHOANALYSIS 5:457-476

    VESTIN, U. (1997) ANTIGONE—A SOUL MURDER. PSYCHOANALYTIC QUARTERLY 66:082-092

    WILLIAMS P (2019) ISOLATION. PSYCHOANALYTIC DIALOGUES, 29:1–12,


    Presented by

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis/CCP Program Committee: Toula Kourliouros Kalven, Alan Levy, PhD, Zak Mucha, LCSW

    The Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis is an IRS 501(C)(3) charitable organization, and expenses may be tax deductible to the extent allowed by law and your personal tax situation.



    • 1 Sep 2024
    • (CDT)
    • Online
    Register


    Certificate in Psychoanalysis

    Application Procedure


    CLICK REGISTER ON THE LEFT TO COMPLETE ONLINE APPLICATION

    Please include the following with your application:

    1. A biographical statement, including a personal history and a statement of your motivations for deciding to become a psychoanalyst or psychoanalytic scholar.
    2. Your Curriculum Vitae.
    3. For the clinical track, a copy of your state license.
    4. For the clinical track, a copy of the cover page of your malpractice insurance and, if relevant, a detailed statement of claims made.
    5. A letter of  recommendation from each of the 3 individuals you named as a reference.
    6. After your application has been received you will be invoiced a non refundable application fee of $100 to be paid online.
    7. Upon the review of your application, you will be  contacted in order to arrange personal interviews with at least three members of the CCP Admissions Committee or Board of Directors.

    Admissions decisions are made by the full Board of Directors or its Executive Committee, based on recommendations by the Admissions Committee. Applicants to CCP will be contacted via phone or email by the Director of Administration. After acceptance, candidates should enroll for courses for the current year and submit payment prior to the start of their first course.


Past events

9 Feb 2024 Fridays @CCP: Enchanted by an illusion: Exciting Objects, Their Vicissitudes, and Treatment (Alan Levy, PhD)
19 Jan 2024 Fridays @CCP: Somatization and Symbolization: Clinical Considerations (Marilyn Charles, PhD)
5 Jan 2024 Fridays @CCP: A Shimmering Landscape: the imaginative and actual in psychic life (Dodi Goldman, PhD)
10 Dec 2023 CCP Movie Night: Screening of 'Your Mum and Dad'
1 Dec 2023 Fridays @CCP: Dyking Oedipal Logics of Sexual Difference: Cultivating Psychoanalytic Imagination through Queer Kinship, Creative Bodies, and Fertile Minds (Chris Nadler, PhD, LP)
12 Nov 2023 Sundays @CCP: Discussion of a clinical case (Natalia Yangarber, PhD)
20 Oct 2023 Fridays @CCP: The Oedipal Virtual Citadel: Varieties of Isolation, Oedipal Conflict, and Cover-Up (Steven Cooper, PhD)
6 Oct 2023 Hedda Bolgar Series: Analytic Love, Self-Compassion and the Growth of Internal Secure Attachment (Daniel Shaw, LCSW)
22 Sep 2023 Hedda Bolgar Series: Psychoanalytic Babies: Infancy and the Infantile in Winnicott, Bion and Klein (Steven Seligman, DMH)
10 Sep 2023 Autumn Open House
8 Sep 2023 Hedda Bolgar Series: Ordinary Uncanniness of Everyday Psychoanalytic Life: Back to the Future of Psychoanalysis & Inaugural Remarks (Anthony Bass, PhD)
15 Aug 2023 Application for: 2023-2024 Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Certificate Program
9 Jun 2023 Fridays @CCP: Why Metapsychology? (Alan Bass, PhD)
12 May 2023 Fridays @CCP: Rethinking Madness: An Argument for a Dimensional Understanding of Psy-chopathology (Nancy McWilliams, PhD, ABPP)
23 Apr 2023 Spring Open House
21 Apr 2023 Fridays @CCP: All But Dissertation (ABD), All But Parricide (ABP); Young Adulthood and the Mutual Act of Individuation (Christopher Bonovitz, PsyD)
24 Mar 2023 Fridays @CCP: The Racial Legacy of Freud’s Psychoanalysis (Celia Brickman, PhD.,LCPC)
3 Mar 2023 Fridays @CCP: A Few Regrets (Joyce Slochower, PhD)
12 Feb 2023 Fridays @CCP: The Moral Injuries of Everyday Clinical Practice (Alan Levy, PhD & Tracy Vega, LCSW)
3 Feb 2023 Fridays @CCP: To reconsider the death drive (David Lichtenstein, PhD)
13 Jan 2023 Fridays @CCP: The Revolutionary Legacies of Fairbairn and Pichon Riviere (David Scharff, MD)
18 Dec 2022 Psychoanalysis in time of historical catastrophes, war and pandemic. (Francoise Davoine)
2 Dec 2022 Fridays @CCP: Only That Breath Breathing Human Being: Psychoanalysis, Religious Ideation, and Spiritual Experience(Claude Barbre, PhD)
18 Nov 2022 Hedda Bolgar Series: Finding Home in the Foreign: Otherness in Immigration (Julia Beltsiou, PhD)
21 Oct 2022 Hedda Bolgar Series:Experiences of uprootedness in an unsafe world. Dogma and complexity. (Renos Papadopoulos, PhD)
7 Oct 2022 Fridays @CCP: The Challenge of Loneliness: Lessons from Frieda Fromm-Reichmann’s Life and Work (Gail Hornstein, PhD)
23 Sep 2022 Fridays @CCP: Perpetrator Ghosts: When we are invisible to ourselves (Sue Grand, PhD)
11 Sep 2022 Hedda Bolgar Series: CCP Inaugural Comments (Alan J. Levy, PhD) and Tourists and Refugees: psychoanalysis and the experience of exile (Steven Reisner, PhD)
16 Aug 2022 Application for: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Certificate Program
24 Jun 2022 Fridays @CCP:The drives and civilization (Dominique Scarfone, MD)
20 May 2022 Fridays @CCP: Lived Depth: Exploring dimensionality and Thirdness in Clinical Process (Jack Foehl, PhD)
6 May 2022 Fridays @CCP: Haunted by haunted minds: Decolonizing psychoanalytic work with historically traumatized peoples (Nina Thomas, PhD, ABPP)
8 Apr 2022 Fridays @CCP: The Dialogue of Unconsciouses, Mutual Analysis and the Uses of the Self in Contemporary Relational Psychotherapy (Anthony Bass, PhD)
25 Mar 2022 Fridays @CCP: Love, Longing and Desire: On the Analyst’s Erotic Subjectivity (Steven Kuchuck, DSW, LCSW)
11 Mar 2022 Fridays @CCP: Projective and Introjective Identification: Graphic Illustrations from Couples Therapy (Peter Reiner, PhD, LMFT)
18 Feb 2022 Fridays @CCP: White Privilege: Psychoanalytic Perspectives (Neil Altman, PhD)
28 Jan 2022 Fridays @CCP: Aspiring to tolerate being a “bad”, yet ethical, analyst: Radical openness to one’s ordinary failures (Anton Hart, PhD)
7 Jan 2022 Fridays @CCP: Maternal Envy as Legacy: Search for the Unknown Lost Maternal Object (Jill Salberg, PhD)
10 Dec 2021 Fridays @CCP: Climate Justice and Psychotherapeutics (Donna Orange, PhD, PsyD)
12 Nov 2021 Fridays @CCP: Humiliation Is Not Just About the Intent to Shame and Degrade (Richard Chefetz, MD)
29 Oct 2021 Hedda Bolgar Series: Freud, Lacan and the Psychic Pleasures of Race (Sheldon George, PhD)
8 Oct 2021 Hedda Bolgar Series: The Biopsychosocial Significance of Understanding Racial Battle Fatigue (William Smith, PhD)
17 Sep 2021 Hedda Bolgar Series: Plenty Good Room: The Theoretical and Therapeutic Contributions of Margaret Morgan Lawrence-- Pioneer African American Psychoanalyst, Psychiatrist, and Pediatrician (Claude Barbre, MS, MDiv, PhD, LP)
11 Jun 2021 Fridays @ CCP: An Overview of Freud’s Cases (Alan Bass, PhD)
14 May 2021 Fridays @ CCP: The Haunting of Hill House:Psyche, Soma, and Destiny (Marilyn Charles, PhD)
23 Apr 2021 Fridays @ CCP: A Psychodynamic Response to Community Trauma: A Case Study and Panel Discussion (Jonathan Foiles, LCSW)
9 Apr 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Narcissistic States of White Privilege and the Constructive Role of Shame (Stephen Anen, PhD)
19 Mar 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Divided against Oneself: Shame, Inhibition and Life’s Aftermath (Peter Shabad, PhD)
26 Feb 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Doppelgangers in the Mirror: Identifications with the Oppressor and Traumatic Psychosocial Inductions (Claude Barbre, PhD)
5 Feb 2021 Fridays @ CCP: Orphans of the Real-Revisited (Joseph Newirth, PhD)
15 Jan 2021 Fridays @ CCP: The Desire for Change: From Freud's Conversion to Today's Conversion Disorder (Jamieson Webster, PhD)
4 Dec 2020 Fridays @ CCP: The Elusive Good Object (Lynne Zeavin, PsyD)
6 Nov 2020 Fridays @ CCP: The Untelling: Enactment, Time, and Narrative in Psychoanalysis (Robert Grossmark, PhD)
16 Oct 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Field Theory and the Dream Sense (Donnel Stern, PhD)
11 Sep 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Transcendence in the Analytic Process (Frank Summers, PhD)
12 Jun 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Alan Bass, PhD - The Development Kleinian Theory and Practice
6 Mar 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Andrea Celenza, PhD - The Erotic Field and the Fate of Feminine Signifiers
7 Feb 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Ghislaine Boulanger, PhD - Psychoanalytic Witnessing: Professional Obligation or Moral Imperative?
17 Jan 2020 Fridays @ CCP: Alan Levy, PhD - Psychodynamics, Integration, and Multiplicity: Object Constancy Reconsidered
3 May 2019 Fridays @ CCP: Stephen Seligman, PhD - Psychoanalytic Babies:Relational-Developmental Psychoanalysis Now
26 Apr 2019 The Ethics of Best Practices: Psychoanalytic Treatment of Psychosis in the Community
12 Apr 2019 Fridays @ CCP: Dominique Scarfone, MD - Free-association, surprise, trauma and transference
29 Mar 2019 Fridays @ CCP: Ester Hadassa Sandler, MD & Paulo Cesar Sandler, MD - Some ideas on ‘ mentalities’: an approach to the study of Bion’s contributions to Psychoanalysis
15 Mar 2019 Fridays @CCP: Fashioning a New Psychoanalysis: Freudianism and the Masses Between the World Wars
7 Dec 2018 Fridays @ CCP: Todd Essig, PhD - Psychoanalysis, Technology And Innovation: How "Local Therapy" is the Future
2 Nov 2018 Fridays @ CCP: Sarah Nettleton - Idiom, self and character

"Nothing human is alien to me"  --Terrence

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Chicago Center for Psychoanalysis & Psychotherapy is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. PO Box 6095, Evanston, IL 60204-6095

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